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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
boehner. i'm not sure that i see it yet. the president said you have to go to the clinton area, 36% top marginal rate. and you said a few loopholes that's fine but not the real battle we should be undertaking. am i correct? >> now boehner we're back to% where we were before the election in some respects. there is a significant core of the republican party that simply will not raise taxes under any sixths. they will not raise rates. they still feel that they are pledged to grover norquist, maybe not to the american people. not to the constitution, but to grover norquist. therefore they're not going to go along--even if boehner wants them to go along. both sides the president and democrats on one side, boehner and the republicans are basically maneuvering for bargaining position for what is going to be a long-term negotiation. >> eliot: they're just shadow boxing, i think that's exactly right. i wonder and i'm trying to assess--i have no knowledge of what goes on inside the republican party but i'm trying to discern if boehner has more strength now than he did when this negotiation took p
. igor, back to more serious stuff we ought to be talking about. so john boehner is saying hey we can have -- we can find some common ground here and republicans are quick to say yeah, let's follow the boehner thing. when you look at what boehner is saying about how to avoid the fiscal cliff he's not saying we're going to agree with president obama on anything yet right? >> not yet. at least publicly, he's just reheating the old romney proposal which is if you close deductions, that's where you get your revenue. not from letting the high end tax cuts expire. the high-end tax cuts expire. what obama had been campaigning on and what voters want overwhelmingly. so you know, the administration has actually been fairly optimistic about where boehner is and negotiating with boehner and negotiating maybe with some of the rank and file who are more likely to come to an agreement. maybe go into the senate. and doing this very publicly. they're meeting with a lot of groups with labor groups, with business groups and they've
he does certainly from the far right of his party. you saw boehner say that the party wants to be led. they want to be led as americans, not republicans. again, i think you have somebody like bill crystal who comes out and says republicans need to be more flexible in terms of talking about tax reform. i think norquist in that clip showed a real misreading of what the election was really about. i prish his use of the word -- >> an odd choice of words. >> poopy head. >> they got a thumping here. this is the first president since ronald reagan to win the popular vote in two consecutive elections. they're trying to deny his legitimacy still. >> not all. >> grover norquist is. >> and speaker boehner has said they're ready to be led. >> thank god for one reasonable person. >> he says he's the most reasonable. >> we'll see what happens in january, though. he has that radical right wing tea party caucus to deal with in the house. i want to see them come to grips with reality. >> great pleasure having you both on. as people continue to suffer in the wake of hurricane sandy, thousands are homel
's debt crisis. but speaker john boehner told house republicans that after last week's election the mandate from the american people is to work together even if it means additional revenues through tax reform. meanwhile bill kristol, editor of "the weekly standard," seemed to cave in on the president's demand that wealthy people pay more. >> you know what? it won't kill the country if we raise taxes a little bit on millionaires. it really won't, i don't think. really? t >> reporter: the president begins making his case this week. what's different this time is that administration officials are already suggesting to congress that mr. obama is willing to let the deadline pass, let tax rates go up, and spending be cut if he can't get the deal he wants. norah, charlie? >> wow. bill plante in washington, thank you. >>> later this morning we'll ask conservative activist grover norquist if republicans are backing away from his no tax increase pledge. >>> two weeks ago today superstorm sandy battered the northeast. more than 100,000 homes and businesses still have no power. most of them
boehner, basically had a deal in place, it ended up getting blown up at the last minute. i think there is a, perhaps, a new conciliation on both sides. i think they were waiting for the election to get over. i think the attitudes are positive on both sides. and i think they've got the framework for a deal already set up from last year. so i don't think that there are any closer but i also don't think they were that far away last year in 2011. >> do you think that closing the loopholes would be enough for a deficit reduction package? >> it doesn't appear that that's going to raise enough revenue to get to where the democrats want that to be. republicans say they don't want to raise rates. there are some -- there's some budget chicanery that can go on in terms of dealing with one baseline instead of another baseline. that's what it looked like boehner wanted to do last year. there are a lot of different options here. it's interesting, bill kristol from the weekly standard appeared to be talking to grover norquist, the anti-tax activist in those comments that he played earlier, talk
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)